The Caregiver's Beacon Newsletter

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
The Caregiver’s Beacon (tm)
“Tell me why – Show me how – Hold my hand”
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
July 1, 2002                                                                                 Vol. 5 No. 13
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ALZwell Caregiver Support and ElderCare Online
http://www.alzwell.com and http://www.ec-online.net
Serving the Needs of Caregivers Since 1996
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Dear Friends,

The political debate in Washington has begun to sound more and more ridiculous and strained. Just this past week, the Republican-controlled House of Representatives barely passed legislation that would enact a limited prescription drug benefit for people covered by Medicare. Meanwhile, the Democrat-controlled Senate has not even begun debate on a comparable bill. If the House and Senate can’t agree on a new drug benefit, then the political football gets tossed into the November elections. And all that means is more rhetoric and more delay.

And things are only getting worse for families and the federal government. Prescription drug prices for the most popular pills used by seniors are rising much faster than most other goods. While these drugs are life-savers, they are also bank-breakers for everyone involved. Just to put things into perspective, most seniors pay about $1,000 a year for prescription drugs. If the government took over even a very limited portion of those costs as part of the proposed plans, it could cost taxpayers as much as $320 billion over ten years. And that’s the low estimate!

In even the best of political climates, paying out a few hundred billion dollars would be a strain on our system. Add in two of the most powerful political lobbies (seniors and drug makers), weigh that against many hotly contested elections in November, and consider the very real possibility that one or both houses of Congress could change parties, and you have a recipe for stonewalling, name calling, and inaction.

Unfortunately those families who are financially strapped get caught in the middle. But families can save some money in the meantime if they research the many small drug discount and rebate programs available to them. Start with our informative article “Tips on… Saving Money on Prescription Drugs” at http://www.ec-online.net/Knowledge/Articles/drugcosts.html. We provide some immediate practical suggestions because help from the government is at least three years away… and I am an optimist.

Kind Regards,
Rich O’Boyle, Publisher
ALZwell Caregiver Support
ElderCare Online
Prism Caregiver Education Series

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Feature Article: “You and Your Doctor: It Takes Two to Tango” by Pauline Salvucci, M.A.
Caregiving Tip: Summer Heat Tips
Keepin’ Up With ALZwell: Caregiver Stories, News, and Medication Fact Sheet
Our Sponsor: Link to Life: Personal Response Service
ElderCare Bookstore: Featured Author Pauline Salvucci, M.A.
Top Alzheimers/Caregiving Websites: Alzheimer’s Support Awareness Campaign
ElderCare Forum: Latest Postings
Chat Schedule: Updates for June
Subscription Information

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

FEATURE ARTICLE: “You and Your Doctor: It Takes Two to Tango” by Pauline Salvucci, M.A.

Your medical care is a two way street. In a good doctor patient relationship, you and your physician are accountable to one other. You have a right to good healthcare -- and you have a responsibility to get it. Distinguish yourself in the all too familiar world of impersonal healthcare and learn how to be your own best advocate.

You may not think of your relationship with your doctor as a dance, but it is. When you and your physician are in step with one another good things happen. Your doctor listens to you, makes a diagnosis and offers information about your condition and its treatment. You feel free to ask questions, request more information and discuss your treatment options. You respect and satisfy your need to understand your medical condition so you can follow through with the treatment that's best for you. Together, you and your doctor form a partnership that focuses on your healthcare needs and meets your expectations.

However, when you and your doctor aren't in step, important questions often go unasked, adequate information is not always forthcoming and alternative options may not be examined. If you and your physician don't communicate openly and freely, perhaps it's time to examine what's keeping the two of you out of step, how this can negatively affect your healthcare and what you can do to change it.

Read the complete article at http://www.ec-online.net/Knowledge/Articles/twototango.html

CAREGIVING TIP: Summer Heat Tips

Dehydration is a big concern during hot summer months. As a caregiver or friend, you can help avoid this by making sure your elder’s air conditioner and fans are working properly. It is also a good idea to help them keep a bottle of cold water or other beverage handy. The bottle should be readily accessible and easy for him/her to open. Keep in frequent contact with your elder to ensure their safety. Unusual confusion can be a sign of heat stroke and dehydration. Check with your health professional for more information, or with emergency medical professionals if you have immediate concerns about your loved one.

HEAT CRAMPS are painful muscular contractions caused by a loss of important electrolyte salts. The loss of the salts, which can occur because of dehydration or inadequate fluid intake, causes the muscles to cramp uncomfortably.

Signs and Symptoms
- pale, clammy skin
- sweating if associated with exertion
- cramping pains in the limbs or abdomen
- nausea
- uncontrolled spasms of affected limb(s)

Care and Treatment
- rest in the shade
- when nausea passes, give sips of cool water to drink (with caution)
- DO NOT massage affected limb
- DO NOT encourage further exercise

HEAT EXHAUSTION is caused by exertion accompanied by heat and high humidity. It particularly affects the very young and the elderly. 

Signs and Symptoms
- pale, clammy skin
- profuse and prolonged sweating
- cramps in the limbs and/or abdomen
- nausea and/or vomiting
- headache
- lethargy

Care and Treatment
- complete rest in the shade, no further exertion
- cool casualty by sponging with tepid water
- when nausea passes, give cool water to drink (cautiously)
- ensure casualty has assistance when recovered

HEAT STROKE is not to be confused with 'sun stroke', the common ailment of headache and nausea suffered by children and adults who remain in the sun too long without a hat. Also known as 'Core Temperature Emergency', heat stroke is potentially fatal. In this condition, the body's temperature regulation center in the brain has been rendered inoperable, and the temperature continually rises, causing eventual brain damage. Immediate active intervention is necessary to avoid coma and death.

Signs and Symptoms
- flushed, hot, dry skin
- the casualty has ceased sweating
- rapid, strong pulse (sometimes irregular)
- irrational or aggressive behavior
- staggering gait
- visual disturbances
- vomiting
- collapse and seizures
- coma - death 

Care and Treatment
- urgent ambulance transport
- complete rest in shade
- remove casualty's clothing
- cool casualty with any means possible
- be prepared to resuscitate as required
- nothing by mouth - rehydration is required by intravenous fluids administered by a doctor or ambulance crew

Source: http://www.parasolemt.au.com 

KEEPIN’ UP WITH ALZWELL: Stories, Poems, News, Medication Update

I have added a few Alzheimer’s-related items to the ALZwell Caregiver Support website. You can visit each new item individually by following the hyperlinks below, or just go directly to ALZwell Caregiver Support at http://www.alzwell.com.

OUR SPONSOR: Link to Life: Personal Response Service

“Link to Life has been very crucial in keeping my mother living independently in her home. Without your wonderful service, she would be in a nursing home."

“My children are grateful for such a service. Because they work, they can’t always be here, but the button around my neck assures them I will receive help immediately if I need it. ”

For more than twenty years, Link to Life has been providing quality, caring Personal Response Services to thousands of satisfied Subscribers like these.

As a Link to Life Subscriber, those you love or provide care for will be able to get help at the touch of a button, even if they are unable to reach the phone. The lightweight, waterproof personal help button, worn on a necklace, wristband or belt clip, sends a signal to our base unit connected to an ordinary phone line in the home. Within seconds, a Response Center Operator is able to communicate with the Subscriber from wherever they are in their home, addressing the Subscriber’s needs with all the necessary information at their fingertips.

Most calls are resolved with the simple assurance of a Link to Life Operator’s warm, friendly voice. In more serious situations, we would immediately begin following the response steps outlined by you and the Subscriber prior to the installation of our service. You tell us what you want done in the event of an emergency, including who to contact to provide assistance, which hospital and doctor is preferred, and who to notify about the Subscriber’s situation and condition. We can also provide health insurance information, pre-existing medical conditions and prescription drug data to medical personnel - any information that can help.

While many equate Personal Response Services with loss of independence, just the opposite is true. Knowing that help is just a touch of a button away- 24 hours a day, 365 days a year- provides Link to Life Subscribers with the confidence and security they need to live alone in their own homes safely and with dignity.

Our services provide peace of mind to a Subscriber’s family and caregivers. Although you can’t always be with the Subscriber, you can be assured that Link to Life is. And you have the added comfort of knowing you will be contacted immediately and be kept up to date if something should happen.

In addition to providing peace of mind, Link to Life prevents serious medical complications. In an emergency, the amount of time someone has to wait for help affects outcomes. Studies show that, after a fall, receiving immediate medical attention reduces an elderly person’s likelihood of hospitalization by 26% and death by over 82%.

Link to Life’s Operators follow through on all calls until help arrives, ensuring the quickest possible intervention and the best possible outcome. Our services don’t stop there - ongoing and next day follow up, a SafeTravel Card to provide all necessary information if an accident happens away from home and many other benefits are all included.

For more information about Link to Life, or to order the service visit, our web site at http://www.link-to-life.com or call us at 1-800-338-4176.

ELDERCARE BOOKSTORE: Featured Author Pauline Salvucci, M.A.

Amazon.com Update: Free shipping on orders of $49 or more… Includes kitchenwares, items from Target, and all books and videos...

Pauline Salvucci, M.A., is a personal and professional life coach, speaker, founder and President of Self Care Connection, LLC, an Internet coaching company. Pauline coaches family caregivers "sandwiched" between their families and their aging parents and those living with chronic illness. As a former therapist with more than 20 years experience, Pauline spent 10 years in a medical family practice as a licensed marriage and family therapist counseling caregivers, men and women living with chronic illness and healthcare professionals. She is the author of numerous articles on self-care and personal development, including the popular "Self-Care Now!" booklet series, and the online Self Care Connection monthly newsletter. You can visit her web site at http://www.SelfCareConnection.com

Pauline says: "My personal challenges include being an author, business owner and family caregiver for the second time. My core belief is that as we translate our hopes into actions, we create greater meaning and satisfaction in our lives -- even with the many challenges we experience as caregivers."

(1) Self-Care Now! 30 Tips to Help You Take Care of Yourself & Minimize Caregiver Burnout

Self-Care Now! 30 Tips to Help You Take Care of Yourself & Minimize Caregiver Burnout, helps caregivers move beyond the obstacles that keep them -- and their practice of self-care -- stuck. Professional healthcare providers along with family caregivers will benefit from this indispensable and informational guide that explores how complex emotions like shame, the fear of "selfishness" and the concept of guilt become the myths that trap and smother the ability to practice self-care. The 30 proven practical tips and strategies -- plus a self-care quiz -- help readers break through limiting thought and action patterns, increase their ability to meet tough challenges and minimize discouragement and exhaustion that contribute and lead to caregiver burnout.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0970593910/eldercareonlinet

(2) Self-Care Now! 30 Ways to Overcome Obstacles That Prevent You From Taking Care of Yourself

Those who play the roles of parent, bread winner, employee, spouse, friend and colleague, feel the walls close in but often have no idea of how to stop being overwhelmed -- or of how to minimize and overcome the obstacles that prevent them from taking care of themselves. The book explores and describes the core obstacles that prevent you from practicing self-care and getting more from your life -- and provides logical and insightful ways to overcome those obstacles. This indispensable and informational guide explores how complex emotions like shame, the fear of "selfishness" and the concept of guilt become the myths that trap and smother your ability to practice of self-care.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0970593902/eldercareonlinet

(3) Self-Care Now! 30 Tips to Help You Take Care of Yourself When Chronic Illness Turns Your Life Upside Down

Based on the belief and conviction that you can learn to cope with chronic illness because you are more than what ails you, this indispensable and informative guide explores how complex emotions like shame, the fear of "selfishness" and the concept of guilt become the myths that trap and smother the ability to practice self-care and cope with the challenges of living with chronic illness. With 30 proven practical tips and strategies -- plus the self-care quiz -- readers build a positive relationship with their illness, take an active role in their healthcare and accomplish goals that add value to their lives.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0970593929/eldercareonlinet

Reader’s Choice Booklist for June 2002

(Links and some reviews are available in the ElderCare Bookstore at http://www.ec-online.net/Connections/bookstore.htm)

(1) Coping with Your Difficult Older Parent: A Guide for Stressed Out Children by Grace Lebow and Barbara Kane
(2) The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for Persons with Alzheimer’s Disease, Related Dementing Illnesses, and Memory Loss in Later Life by Nancy Mace and Peter Rabins
(3) Alzheimer's: The Answers You Need by Helen Davies and Michael Jensen
(4) Caring for Yourself While Caring for Your Aging Parents: How to Help, How to Survive by Claire Berman
(5) The Medicaid Planning Handbook: A Guide to Protecting Your Family's Assets from Catastrophic Nursing Home Costs (2nd Rev Ed) by Alexander Bove, Jr.
(6) Outrunning Your Shadow: Caring For Dying Parents by Fred Hill
(7) Caring for a Loved One With Alzheimer's Disease: A Christian Perspective by Elizabeth Hall
(8) My Mother’s Voice by Sally Callahan
(9) Are Your Parents Driving You Crazy? How to Resolve the Most Common Dilemmas with Aging Parents by Joseph Ilardo and Carole Rothman
(10) Therapeutic Caregiving: A Practical Guide for Caregivers of Persons With Alzheimer's and Other Dementia Causing Diseases by Barbara Bridges

TOP ALZHEIMERS/CAREGIVING WEBSITES: Alzheimer’s Awareness Campaign 

Many dementia caregivers turn to political and community activism as the learn more about Alzheimer’s Disease (and learn how little we know about it). It is only in the last year or two that we have seen a real increase in government and public support for family caregivers (notably the Family Caregiver Support Program from the federal government and extensive outreach by local Alzheimer’s support groups like the Long Island Alzheimer’s Foundation).

Much of the impetus behind these larger actions has been grassroots activism by Ageless Design (the Alzheimer’s Stamp Petition) and the Caregiver’s Army (Congressional testimony).

Another grassroots network has sprung up dedicated to increasing awareness of dementia and caregiving, “The Awareness Mission Group” with the MSN Support Community. Their purpose is to work to heighten awareness of care giving issues and dementia. They feel that in-depth presentations of the cold hard facts of the impacts of dementia on caregivers are in order. The personal demands on caregivers, disruptions of normal lives and resulting financial strains can be disastrous.

A major project for the "Awareness Mission Group" is an e-mail and letter writing campaign to Dateline NBC, the weekly nighttime news magazine. The goal is to flood the producers with mail asking them to produce a show or series of shows on this disease that affects millions and is expected to reach epidemic level in the near future. The e-mails started on May 27, 2002. All concerned citizens are invited to join in this campaign. Simply send your caregiving story to dateline@nbc.com with a request for a feature on issues related to dementia/care giving.

Like all good activist groups, they make participation by the rest of the population as easy as possible. They have prepared some sample letters that you can add some details and then just e-mail it to Dateline. For more information, visit http://communities.msn.com/AlzheimersSupport/awarenessmission.msnw

For additional Alzheimer’s and Caregiving websites, Brenda Parris Sibley has established one of the best clearinghouses on the Internet. She has contacted and worked with a variety of websites to collect them into a directory with rankings showing which are the most popular. Brenda and the other webmasters and webmistresses have done an excellent job of creating unique and compelling sites that speak directly to family caregivers. In each issue of this newsletter, we will mention one of the many sites that comprise the Top AD/Caregiving Sites List.

You can browse through other sites and vote for ElderCare Online by clicking on the "Top AD/Caregiving Sites" icon on the front page of ElderCare Online at http://www.ec-online.net (or following this complicated link: http://new.topsitelists.com/topsites.cgi?ID=1&user=bpsibley&area=bests.) You are welcome to use ElderCare Online as your portal to access these sites, since I know that you will want to visit again and again. I suggest that you access the list often as new sites are added regularly, and as you explore the list, you are bound to find one that didn't catch your attention last time.

ELDERCARE FORUM: Latest Postings

If you would like to register, please follow this link: http://216.122.139.136/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=agree. Please excuse any little error messages that you may receive. We are working to resolve a software glitch. I will manually send your registration information and password. Just fill out the information and wait. I will get it to you in less than a day (probably within 15 minutes).

(Note: Some of these links may not transfer correctly via e-mail. In that case, just go to the Forum at http://216.122.139.136/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi or read this newsletter off of the website).

We Laugh to Survive: Jokes posted by our members. Be careful, some of these are really dumb or really racy… http://216.122.139.136/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=forum&f=21

News and Research: Several new updates have been posted here by members and our moderators, including the latest information about the role of diet and vitamins in treating and preventing Alzheimer’s Disease at http://216.122.139.136/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=forum&f=26

Daily Challenges: “Need Advice on Door Locks and Alarms:” Member Joanna has requested advice and ideas for preventing wandering and keeping her home safe and secure. Please share your ideas with her at http://216.122.139.136/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=1&t=000261

Daily Challenges: “Help With Prescription Drug Costs:” We have posted several links and suggestions on how caregivers can get a handle on drug costs. These approaches include finding programs in your area that you can sign up for (usually at no cost), as well as state programs for the needy. http://216.122.139.136/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=1&t=000227

Less Common Dementias: We have an entire discussion board for those caregivers who find their loved ones have one of the rare forms of dementia, including Lewy Body Disease, Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus, or Pick’s Disease, among others. This is a great place to link up with those far-flung caregivers who share your particular concerns. http://216.122.139.136/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=forum&f=34

New Caregiver’s Meeting Room: “Denial:” This is an interesting thread because it speaks to a common caregiver issue… denial by our loved ones that they are having trouble as they age… either with dementia or safety. I’m sure that many of you will be able to relate to Lee2’s personal story, and perhaps share your own at http://216.122.139.136/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=40&t=000051

New Caregiver’s Meeting Room: “Beginning the Journey:” Please welcome new member NancyC as she begins her own caregiving journey. Her mother has been increasingly forgetful and it appears that she may have dementia. Connect with NancyC at http://216.122.139.136/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=40&t=000049

I, Caregiver: “CGs Health and Survival:” Forum Moderator Edyth Ann has shared some personal reflections on the importance of caring for oneself. Please take the time to read her comments at http://216.122.139.136/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=19&t=000055.

Former Caregivers Meeting Room: For those of us who have moved forward from our caregiving responsibilities, or see light at the end of the tunnel, we have a special section of discussion threads at http://216.122.139.136/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=forum&f=38.

We have literally hundreds of other discussions going on in the Forum. Please come by to browse and read. We cover so many of the issues that all caregivers encounter. Just reading the stories and comments can help you learn. If you have specific questions or feel that you need the support of others just like you, please sign up and join us. Visit the Forum at http://216.122.139.136/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi.

CHAT SCHEDULE: Updates for July

Enter the chatroom from the front page of either website or at http://www.ec-online.net/chat.htm. All times are U.S. Eastern Standard Time (GMT –5). We have begun to provide chats that are hosted by caregivers in Australia. Australian times are GMT +10. Hopefully this will not cause a great deal of confusion and instead give us more opportunities to connect with each other.

Topics are suggested and NOT required. We always focus on the issues and that our members want to discuss. Please remember that we have a new chatroom. If you had trouble using the old one, please give it another try! Please note the new sessions added on Monday evenings, Wednesday mornings, and Saturday afternoons.

Our current chat schedule is posted in the ElderCare Community Center at http://www.ec-online.net/Community/communit.htm as well as at the end of this newsletter.

Most of the chat moderators will be on vacation at some point during the week of July 1 to 6 for the Independence Day holiday. The chatroom will be open, but we will not have facilitators on some days. Please check the schedule. You are welcome to continue to use the chatroom to meet and connect with your caregiving friends.

July 1 (Monday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Bubblehead’s Chatroom:” Host Edyth Ann Knox leads a supportive chat group for dementia caregivers on the topic of “Caregiving for People with Dementia.”

July 3 (Wednesday 5:00 to 7:00AM EST) “Ozcarers' Chatroom (or Pong's Place):" Hosts Pongfoot (David) and Splash (Edith) welcome caregivers from around the world to drop in and put their feet up for a while, chat with other caregivers and "Take a Break."

July 4-7: NO SCHEDULED CHATS

July 8 (Monday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Bubblehead’s Chatroom:” Host Edyth Ann Knox leads a supportive chat group for dementia caregivers on the topic of “Caregiving for People with Dementia.”

July 9 (Tuesday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Children of Aging Parents:” Host Brian Duke from CAPS leads a discussion for family caregivers seeking understanding and resources.

July 10 (Wednesday 5:00 to 7:00AM EST) “Ozcarers' Chatroom (or Pong's Place):" Hosts Pongfoot (David) and Splash (Edith) welcome caregivers from around the world to drop in and put their feet up for a while, chat with other caregivers and "Take a Break."

July 10 (Wednesday 1:00 to 2:00PM EST) “Sugarlips’ Chatroom:” Host Vicki Gardner welcomes caregivers for a social and networking discussion group on the topic of “Expressing Our Emotions.”

July 10 (Wednesday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Bubblehead’s Chatroom:” Host Edyth Ann Knox leads a supportive chat group for dementia caregivers on the topic of “Caregiving for People with Dementia.”

July 11 (Thursday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Sugarlips’ Chatroom:” Host Vicki Gardner welcomes caregivers for a social and networking discussion group on the topic of “Expressing Our Emotions.”

July 15 (Monday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Bubblehead’s Chatroom:” Host Edyth Ann Knox leads a supportive chat group for dementia caregivers on the topic of “Caregiving for People with Dementia.”

July 17 (Wednesday 5:00 to 7:00AM EST) “Ozcarers' Chatroom (or Pong's Place):" Hosts Pongfoot (David) and Splash (Edith) welcome caregivers from around the world to drop in and put their feet up for a while, chat with other caregivers and "Take a Break."

July 17 (Wednesday 1:00 to 2:00PM EST) “Sugarlips’ Chatroom:” Host Vicki Gardner welcomes caregivers for a social and networking discussion group on the topic of “Expressing Our Emotions.”

July 17 (Wednesday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Bubblehead’s Chatroom:” Host Edyth Ann Knox leads a supportive chat group for dementia caregivers on the topic of “Caregiving for People with Dementia.”

July 18 (Thursday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Sugarlips’ Chatroom:” Host Vicki Gardner welcomes caregivers for a social and networking discussion group on the topic of “Expressing Our Emotions.”

July 22 (Monday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Bubblehead’s Chatroom:” Host Edyth Ann Knox leads a supportive chat group for dementia caregivers on the topic of “Caregiving for People with Dementia.”

July 23 (Tuesday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Children of Aging Parents:” Host Brian Duke from CAPS leads a discussion for family caregivers seeking understanding and resources.

July 24 (Wednesday 5:00 to 7:00AM EST) “Ozcarers' Chatroom (or Pong's Place):" Hosts Pongfoot (David) and Splash (Edith) welcome caregivers from around the world to drop in and put their feet up for a while, chat with other caregivers and "Take a Break."

July 24 (Wednesday 1:00 to 2:00PM EST) “Sugarlips’ Chatroom:” Host Vicki Gardner welcomes caregivers for a social and networking discussion group on the topic of “Expressing Our Emotions.”

July 24 (Wednesday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Bubblehead’s Chatroom:” Host Edyth Ann Knox leads a supportive chat group for dementia caregivers on the topic of “Caregiving for People with Dementia.”

July 25 (Thursday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Sugarlips’ Chatroom:” Host Vicki Gardner welcomes caregivers for a social and networking discussion group on the topic of “Expressing Our Emotions.”

July 29 (Monday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Bubblehead’s Chatroom:” Host Edyth Ann Knox leads a supportive chat group for dementia caregivers on the topic of “Caregiving for People with Dementia.”

July 31 (Wednesday 5:00 to 7:00AM EST) “Ozcarers' Chatroom (or Pong's Place):" Hosts Pongfoot (David) and Splash (Edith) welcome caregivers from around the world to drop in and put their feet up for a while, chat with other caregivers and "Take a Break."

July 31 (Wednesday 1:00 to 2:00PM EST) “Sugarlips’ Chatroom:” Host Vicki Gardner welcomes caregivers for a social and networking discussion group on the topic of “Expressing Our Emotions.”

July 31 (Wednesday 9:00 to 11:00PM EST) “Bubblehead’s Chatroom:” Host Edyth Ann Knox leads a supportive chat group for dementia caregivers on the topic of “Caregiving for People with Dementia.”

Enter the chatroom from the front page of either website or at http://www.ec-online.net/chat.htm.

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION

The Caregiver’s Beacon is published bimonthly by ElderCare Online and ALZwell Caregiver Support. To subscribe to this free newsletter, visit the subscription information page at http://www.ec-online.net/Knowledge/Newsletters/subscribe.htm.

You may also go to the main page of the website at http://www.ec-online.net or http://www.alzwell.com and add your e-mail address to the white box and click on the "Subscribe" button (just one click!).

To unsubscribe from this list, follow the customized link that is provided below by our ListBuilder software. You may also customize your profile and sign up for additional monthly News Briefs on special topics.

(c) 2002 Prism Innovations, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Subscribe Now +++++ Return to Front Page +++++ Read Back Issues